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MORE New Stories

First up, a new feature for Up Here – Seeking Klondike Gold, With Drones.

Second, an essay for Deadspin about the intersection of hockey, fighting, and substance abuse: What Happens to Enforcers When Hockey Uses Them Up?

My most recent Pacific Standard column is about GROLAR BEARS!

And finally, a really fun-to-research piece for Grantland about a forgotten winter sport: The Rise and Fall of Ski Ballet.

New stories!

It’s been a busy few weeks. I came back from Ottawa late in January, and less than two weeks later I hit the road again to follow the Yukon Quest sled dog race to Fairbanks (by car, not by trail). I’ve been home for a little over a week now, catching up on sleep, email, etc.

Meanwhile, I’ve had a few new pieces published.

My story about surfing in Tofino is in the latest issue of AFAR. It’s available online, but pick up the print version if you can – the photo spread/layout they put together is gorgeous.

For Longreads, I wrote about how The Atlantic’s Ta-Nehisi Coates built a unique and important corner of the internet – in his comments section. It’s Yours: A Short History of The Horde.

My story about the 2015 Yukon Quest, with wonderful photos by Katie Orlinsky, is up online at National Geographic: Survival is the Ultimate Goal in World’s Toughest Sled Dog Race.

Alaska will no longer have bars on its state ferries. I wrote an obituary for them over at Hazlitt.

And my biweekly column for Pacific Standard is now through its second month. They’re all collected here.

New Story, New Gigs

Happy New Year!

I’ve had a busy start to 2015. I launched a biweekly reported column for Pacific Standard, Dispatches From a Changing Arctic, about environmental issues in the North – I’m excited to work on it throughout the year. I also have a new story in the January issue of Up Here: Cold Hard Competition is about the athletes who run for hundreds of miles through the frozen Yukon backcountry in the annual Yukon Arctic Ultra.

Speaking of Up Here, there have been some big changes there. Sister mag Up Here Business has been merged with Up Here, and the new incarnation of the magazine will come out monthly, instead of 8 times a year. I’m now on contract as the Yukon Correspondent, and will be contributing regularly to future issues.

What I Read in 2014

I managed to read a heap of good stuff this year, nearly all of it narrative nonfiction. I burned through Katherine Boo’s Behind the Beautiful Forevers back in January, and I still can’t quite comprehend how she transformed her years of reporting into such a seamless story. I picked up John Jeremiah Sullivan’s instant-classic essay collection, Pulphead, during a trip to Boulder in March, and have been working my way through it ever since. Later that same month I read two fascinating books by writer pals of mine during a three-day ferry ride from Bellingham, Washington, to Southeast Alaska: The Oil Man and the Sea, Arno Kopecky’s chronicle of a sailing trip through the proposed tanker route for a controversial pipeline, and The Footloose American, about a young Hunter S. Thompson in South America, by Brian Kevin.

In the spring I read two wonderful books by Mike Paterniti: Driving Mr. Albert, about a cross-country road trip with Einstein’s brain, and The Telling Room, a complicated and thoughtful story about a famous Spanish cheese. Over the summer and fall I read three very different books, but each one in a single sitting or close to it: Robert Kolker’s Lost Girls, the story of a group of young women who were murdered – presumably by one uncaught killer – on Long Island; The Emerald Mile, by Kevin Fedarko, about an illegal speed run through a flooded Grand Canyon in a tiny wooden boat; and John Branch’s Boy On Ice, about the life and early death of NHL enforcer Derek Boogaard.

In terms of shorter stuff, I tried my best to keep up with the wonderful stories published by The Atavist all year. I managed to get to Love and Ruin, James Verini’s tale of romance in Cold War Afghanistan, and Charles Homans’ taxidermy heist story, The Dead Zoo Gang. I read A Thousand Pounds of Dynamite, about a casino extortion scheme, and The Trials of White Boy Rick, about a young white crime kingpin in Detroit, and 52 Blue, Leslie Jamison’s sad, thoughtful story about a lone whale and loneliness.

Some other stories that stuck out for me this year: my friend Lauren Quinn’s excellent The Ism and the Alcohol, on addiction and recovery narratives; Landays: Cries of the Pashtun Women, Eliza Griswold’s look at the short rebellious poems shared among women on the Afghanistan-Pakistan border; Jon Mooallem’s Lest Ye Be Judged, about a pastor who ministers to major league baseball umpires; Outside Magazine’s 1997 classic on the fine details of freezing to death; Remote Control, Sarah Marshall’s look back at Tonya Harding and Nancy Kerrigan; the very smart Greg Howard on Ferguson: America Is Not For Black People; Brian Phillips’ lovely, haunting sumo epic, Sea of Crises; and finally, The Case For Reparations, an eye-opener from Ta-Nehisi Coates.

New Story!

I’m thrilled to have a short feature in the January issue of Smithsonian Magazine. It’s about dinosaurs, and what a visit to Alberta can teach us about their extinction.

The reporting trip for this story offered a quasi-fulfilment of my childhood dream of becoming a paleontologist. A lot of the field work I tagged along on got cut from the story, but here’s a shot of me helping to wrap newly uncovered fossils in plaster-and-burlap jackets for transport to the lab:

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Catching Up

All year I’ve had an item sitting on my To Do list, woefully un-crossed-off: “update website.” So, here goes! Some highlights from 2014:

Way back in January I published a fun story on SB Nation Longform: Wilderness Women, in which I competed to be named “Alaska Wilderness Woman 2013″ and earn myself an Alaskan bachelor. In March and early April, Pacific Standard ran a week-long series of pieces I wrote about “opting out” of society in one form or another; the series was anchored by a narrative feature called The Peacemaker, about an Alaskan militia leader accused of conspiring to murder federal officials.

In early May I attempted Canada’s national standardized fitness test for wildland firefighters, and wrote about it for the Yukon News. In June, SB Nation Longform published Why We Play, a piece on risk-taking and sports that is part-personal essay and part-reporting about a remarkable local athlete, Darryl Tait. Birth of a Birder, a World Hum story about my April 2013 trip to the Galapagos, was published in June too. And in July my story about the little-known WWII internment of the Aleuts, from the Spring 2014 issue of Maisonneuve, went online.

I’ve continued to contribute regularly to Up Here and Up Here Business magazines. I wrote two pieces for Up Here’s history column, “Looking Back”: one on the notorious Chilkoot Trail avalanche that killed dozens of gold-seekers, and one on the sad story of Bruce Johnson, Canada’s first Yukon Quest champion. I profiled Chief Mathieya Alatini of the Kluane First Nation for Up Here Business. I also put a lot of work into a feature about the mystery of a dead German hiker:
A Cold and Deadly Place.

SKYE on AOL, the website that originally published my story about the “McCandless pilgrims,” has gone offline – I republished the story using Creatavist: Chasing Alexander Supertramp. I’m also thrilled to announce that the story has been included in an anthology that was just released: The Best Women’s Travel Writing Volume 10.

What else? I appeared on Gangrey: The Podcast, which was really fun. I traveled to new-to-me places in Alaska, the Yukon, NWT, British Columbia, Alberta, and the Lower 48. I landed some big story contracts at big publications, and I’m excited to share those pieces when they’re published. I’ve been working very part-time at a local radio station, reading the news and sports live on air.

I guess I can’t expect to jam a year’s worth of updates into one post, so I’ll stop here. More soon.

I read a lot this year, much more than I managed in 2012 when I was working full time for two magazines and freelancing heavily on the side.

I finally read Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood. And I read some more recent nonfiction classics: The Beak of the Finch, by Jonathan Weiner, while I was cruising in the Galapagos in early April, and Moneyball and Friday Night Lights while I was stuck at home sick, unable to play any sports myself, through the entire month of August. I read a book everyone was talking about a year ago, a year late: Lean In, by Sheryl Sandberg. I read books by writers whose work and lives I follow on Twitter every day: The Skies Belong to Us, by Brendan Koerner, while I was waiting out a snowstorm in my tent at Denali base camp, and Ingenious, by Jason Fagone, also during that sickbed August.

This fall I read two dark, searing books, one set in Somalia and one set in Alaska: A House in the Sky, by Amanda Lindhout and Sara Corbett, and Tom Kizzia’s Pilgrim’s Wilderness. I don’t read much fiction, but I stayed up all night reading Benjamin Percy’s werewolf epic, Red Moon. And as 2013 winds down, I have two books sitting halfway-read beside my bed: Wild Ones, by Jon Mooallem, and Cheryl Strayed’s Tiny Beautiful Things.

I read shorter pieces of writing, too, lots and lots of them. A few stand out in particular: The ones I still find myself telling people about, at a party or over coffee, like Mac McClelland’s Is PTSD Contagious? Or the ones I pass along to my parents or close friends, trying to explain to them the type of storytelling I want to do, like Confessions of a Drone Warrior, by Matthew Power, or The Most Amazing Bowling Story Ever, by Michael Mooney. And the ones I just keep dwelling on, thinking and re-thinking, like Patricia O’Connor’s Private Ceremonies.

I wrote a lot in 2012, and a lot of it was stuff I was really proud of; it seems like I have less of both those things to show for myself in 2013. But I was excited to write two long features for SB Nation Longform: No Sleep ‘Til Fairbanks, about the support crews who work behind the scenes of the Yukon Quest, and The High One, about the 100th anniversary of the first ascent of Denali. I had fun putting together this roundup of the North’s hidden misfits and miscreants, for Up Here. And I was really pleased with how months of work came together in the end for my story about the “McCandless pilgrims” phenomenon, Chasing Alexander Supertramp.

I’ve got lots of exciting stories in the works already for 2014. And plenty on my reading list, too – Happy New Year!

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