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Posts Tagged ‘Vela’

I’m really excited about this one. My story about the Yukon Quest’s handlers – the support crews who work behind the scenes throughout the race – is now live at SB Nation Longform. Check it out:

No Sleep ‘Til Fairbanks

Elsewhere, Vela has a hot new redesign, and we’re also soliciting suggestions for female-authored books that are overlooked in the usual best-of books lists.

My feature in the February issue of Up Here Business is now online; it’s about a new fresh fish truck that’s finally bringing the local catch to Whitehorse. I also have a long Q&A with the Yukon’s top expediter in the March UHB, and a couple of small items in the March issue of Up Here.

Finally, at World Hum, I was pleased to publish Brian Kevin’s The End of Wend, an essay that ponders what the crunchy mag’s demise says about travelers and travel publishing.

It’s been a hectic start to 2013: Lots of work on the go, plus I spent two crazy weeks on the road in February during the Yukon Quest. I’ve got more travel on the horizon, too.

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I flew home from Yellowknife to Whitehorse on Tuesday – it feels great to be settling back in right as the Northern summer is arriving. (It’s 9:30pm now, and still broad daylight.)

I was sick for a good portion of my last three weeks in Yellowknife, so chances are pretty good that I owe you an email. Hang in there, I’m working on it.

What else? I have a profile coming out in the new Up Here Business, which should be on newsstands shortly. We published a 6000-word epic about rafting the Grand Canyon on World Hum this week. Over at Vela, Simone’s latest is a wonderful essay on unexpectedly becoming an army wife. And my friend Luke’s phenomenal story on the Joplin tornado won the National Magazine Award for Feature Writing tonight!

Speaking of National Magazine Awards — Canadian edition — the nominees were announced earlier this week, and Up Here is up for four, including Best Single Issue. It’s an exciting publication to be a part of.

Lots of summer travel plans in Alaska, the Yukon and NWT. More to come!

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New Essay: ‘In the Bush’

My first piece is up on Vela: In the Bush.

It’s about the time I spent working in the Yukon backcountry this past summer. Worth noting: it’s extremely difficult to write about a life-altering experience without actually calling it “life-altering.”

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Vela: Written by Women

I’m thrilled to announce the launch of a new project: Vela, an online magazine featuring “travel-inspired creative nonfiction, written by women.”

I’ll be contributing alongside five other writers — Sarah Menkedick and Lauren Quinn, both of whom I’ve worked with before at World Hum and Matador, as well as Simone Gorrindo, Molly Beer and Amanda Giracca. Sarah is the one who brought us all together; here’s an excerpt from her explanation of the project (and specifically, why it’s “written by women”):

The point here is not that this is a women’s site, by women for women, somehow female, feminine, or feminist in style. The fact that all of the writers are women is almost, almost incidental: it would be completely incidental if the publishing world did not create a situation in which women’s voices represent only a small fraction of the conversation. As it stands, this is the case, and as long as it continues to be the case than I believe in creating a separate space in which women can write what they want to write, with the same intellectual freedom as men; without a major overhaul of self and world views; without having to label themselves as “women writers” with the insinuation that they’ll come to inspiring conclusions about yoga and use laundry as a metaphor for despair; and without having to try and out-male the men, writing in the very male styles and with the very male intelligences so predominant in the literary world.

The alternative to these male styles and intelligences is not some sort of touchy-feeling wishy-washy lovey-dovey female emotional abstraction. I’m not sure what it is. It doesn’t even have to be “female”. It is what happens in the absence of the pressure to “make it” in an industry that is not only physically but intellectually dominated by men. That is what this site is: a space to maneuver freely without having to either set one’s work apart as distinctly female or suck it up trying to prove that women can do what men do and that what men do is the best and the norm.

I’m really excited to see what my fellow writers come up with. A new piece will be posted on Vela each week; my first story will be up at the end of the month.

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